The examination of repeated self-mobilizations with movement and joint mobilizations on individuals with chronic ankle instability

Review written by Dr Travis Pollen info

Key Points

  1. As many as one in three individuals who have sprained their ankle go on to develop chronic ankle instability (CAI).
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BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

As many as one in three individuals who have sprained their ankle go on to develop chronic ankle instability (CAI) (1). CAI is characterized by instability, functional impairments (e.g. range of motion and dynamic balance), and recurrent sprains. Clinician-administered talocrural joint mobilizations have been shown to be an effective treatment for CAI (2). However, little is known about the effectiveness of self-mobilizations, which could reduce the need for clinician supervision.

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of clinician-administered mobilizations and self-mobilizations on ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, dynamic balance, isometric strength, and patient-reported outcomes in individuals with CAI.

Clinician-administered talocrural joint mobilizations have been shown to be an effective treatment for chronic ankle instability.
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Clinician-administered mobilizations and self-mobilization interventions may provide different benefits to the patient.

METHODS

  • 18 individuals with self-reported CAI (7 males, 11 females; 21 ± 2 years old) were randomized to either the clinician mobilization or self-mobilization group.
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