FIVE-SECOND SQUEEZE TESTING IN 333 PROFESSIONAL AND SEMI-PROFESSIONAL MAKE ICE HOCKEY PLAYERS: HOW ARE HIP AND GROIN SYMPTOMS, STRENGTH,AND SPORTING FUNCTION

Review written by Dr Joanne Kemp info

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

Hip and groin pain is common in ice hockey players, as well as footballers. The 5 second adductor squeeze test (5SST) has been used in sports to try and identify those at risk of developing groin pain, as well as monitor the progression of athletes with groin pain. It has also been proposed that the 5SST should include a “traffic light” approach, where pain in the “green range” (pain = 0-2/10) is safe; “yellow range” (pain = 3-5/10) is acceptable; and “red range” (pain = 6-10/10) is high risk. But it is unknown whether the 5SST relates to function and strength, and whether the traffic light approach is a valid approach when using the 5SST.

The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between the 5SST and function and hip muscle strength; and also to see if the traffic light approach was able to discriminate between different levels of function and strength.

METHODS

The authors conducted the study in Sweden, and recruited 333 professional and semi-professional male ice-hockey players. They performed the 5SST on the players, measured their hip abduction and adduction strength using a hand-held dynamometer, and also asked the players to complete the Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Score (HAGOS) questionnaire. They then looked at the relationship between the 5SST, and the strength and HAGOS measures; and also compared the difference between the 3 5SST groups (green, yellow and red) for strength and HAGOS scores. Image

RESULTS

The authors found that the 5SST had a good correlation with the HAGOS Sports subscale, as well as the hip strength measures. This meant that players with the best 5SST (green) also had the highest HAGOS Sport subscale scores, and

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