Individuals with persistent greater trochanteric pain syndrome exhibit impaired pain modulation, as well as poorer physical and psychological health, compared with pain-free individuals: a cross-sectional study

Review written by Dr Sandy Hilton info

Key Points

  • Compared with controls, people with persistent greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) exhibit impaired health-related quality of life, physical strength and functioning, wide-spread hyperalgesia, and altered psychological factors.
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BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

When managing orthopedic conditions, it is important to treat the person as more than the part that hurts. This conceptual model of addressing psychosocial contributions to musculoskeletal pain syndromes and tendinopathies is methodically being explored. While it is intuitively sensible to make broad statements for all musculoskeletal conditions, studies like this one are needed to test for best care options and avoid overstepping the evidence.

The authors of this paper set out to explore the psychosocial contributions surrounding a common lateral hip pain issue, greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS). The study looked at differences in physical, sensory, and psychosocial outcome measures in individuals with GTPS compared to controls. The secondary aim of this study was to identify which factors are associated with pain and disability in people with GTPS.

It is important to treat the person as more than the part that hurts.
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This study reinforces the call to treat the whole person.

METHODS

This study had a cross-sectional design with age and sex-matched controls. 40 participants were in the GTPS and 58 in the control group. Participants were recruited via flyers and newsletters. The assessment was completed by a single clinician in a

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