Labral tears and chondral lesions are common comorbidities identified during endoscopic repair of gluteal tendon tears for greater trochanteric pain syndrome: a systematic review

Review written by Dr Alison Grimaldi info

Key Points

  1. Almost all patients (94%) undergoing endoscopic treatment for recalcitrant greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) have tears of the gluteus medius and/or minimus tendons.
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BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

Greater trochanteric pain is common, with a prevalence ranging from 10 to 25 % of the general population reported (1,2). Traditionally the diagnosis ‘trochanteric bursitis’ was used for lateral hip pain, but it became evident that gluteal tendinopathy was the primary soft tissue pathology associated with trochanteric pain (3). The term Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome (GTPS) is often used as an umbrella term for trochanteric pain associated with local soft tissue pathologies.

Patients with recalcitrant GTPS who do not progress adequately with non-surgical care may be considered for surgical intervention. This sub-population is likely to have more advanced soft tissue pathology and accompanying intra-articular pathology.

This study therefore aimed to systematically review the literature on intraoperative findings during endoscopic treatment for GTPS.

Greater trochanteric pain is common, with a prevalence ranging from 10 to 25 % of the general population reported.
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The presence of pathology identified intra-operatively, or on imaging, does not indicate source of nociception.

METHODS

A systematic review of studies that reported intraoperative findings following endoscopic surgery for treatment of GTPS was performed. The protocol followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines.

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