Midseason screening for groin pain, severity, and disability in 101 elite american youth soccer players: a cross-sectional study

Review written by Stacey Hardin info

Key Points

  1. In elite youth male football players, 1 in 5 present with groin pain during a midseason screening.
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BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

Groin injuries are particularly prevalent in football (soccer), resulting in significant participation time lost. Many athletes, however, continue to play even while experiencing groin pain and tenderness. Much of the hip and groin pain research has been completed in the elite adult football player population. Several studies (1-3) have retrospectively investigated groin pain rates in elite and sub-elite youth football players; however, none have applied the Doha agreement classifications to their description.

The objectives of this study were to:

  1. systemically screen for groin pain and type, and
  2. determine whether hip and groin-severity and disability differed between players with different levels of groin pain and tenderness in locations as described by the Doha agreement taxonomy.

Groin injuries are particularly prevalent in football (soccer), resulting in significant participation time lost.
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In addition to education on early symptom reporting, a robust injury and pain prevention program including evidence-supported exercises, such as the Copenhagen adduction protocol, should be completed.

METHODS

101 elite youth male football players (range 11-18 years old, 14.3 ± 1.8 years old) from one club were evaluated at midseason using a standardized clinical evaluation, the Copenhagen 5-second squeeze test, Hip and Groin Outcome Score (HAGOS), and Hip

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