Power training in older adults with hip osteoarthritis and total hip arthroplasty

Review written by Dr Mariana Wingood info

Key Points

  1. Low-to-moderate intensity exercise for individuals with hip osteoarthritis and total hip arthroplasty results in improvements in pain, strength, muscle morphology, neural adaptation, function, and quality of life.
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BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

In the United States, it is estimated that total hip arthroplasty (THA) accounts for $15 billion of annual healthcare costs (1). With the current shifts in demographics, it is expected that by 2030 there will be a 175% increase in THA procedures (1). The cost and predicted increase in THA procedures highlights the value of ensuring that appropriate preventative strategies are implemented into clinical practice.

One of these strategies is providing appropriately dosed exercise interventions. A type of exercise with minimal research related to its impact on hip osteoarthritis and THA is power training. An example of a power exercise is performing sit-to-stands while wearing weighted vests and standing up as fast as possible (2). Among community-dwelling adults, power training has been identified to improve functional ability and physical performance (2).

The purpose of this paper was to summarize recent evidence on exercise, specifically power training, for the conservative management of hip osteoarthritis and THA.

In the United States, total hip arthroplasty accounts for $15 billion of annual healthcare costs.
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Patients with hip osteoarthritis or THA should perform strengthening of all major muscle groups (particularly those surrounding the hip) three times per week.

METHODS

Databases: PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, and Web of Science.

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