Prevalence of gluteus medius pathology on magnetic resonance imaging in patients undergoing hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement: asymptomatic tears are rare, whereas tendinosis is common

Review written by Dr Michael Reiman info

Key Points

  1. A 16% prevalence of asymptomatic gluteus medius pathology was found in patients undergoing hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement.
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BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

Similar to the rotator cuff, gluteus medius tears occur in a degenerative and chronic fashion in the middle-aged to older population (1,2). This may partly be the reason why gluteus medius tears have historically been referred to as the “rotator cuff tear of the hip” (3,4).

The extent of gluteus medius pathology present in those individuals being treated surgically for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is currently unclear. This study sought to investigate.

Gluteus medius tears occur in a degenerative and chronic fashion in the middle-aged to older population.
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A comprehensive examination including (but not limited to) subjective, clinical and radiological findings is recommended for a most appropriate diagnosis.

METHODS

This was a cross-sectional, level 3 study examining institution database of patients undergoing hip arthroscopy. Subjects were classified as patients if they had confirmed gluteus medius pathology identified through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Subjects were classified as ‘asymptomatic’ if they

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