Weight loss is associated with reduced risk of knee and hip replacement: a survival analysis using osteoarthritis Initiative data

Review written by Anthony Teoli info

Key Points

  1. This study demonstrated a positive association between percentage of body weight change from baseline and the risk of knee replacement and hip replacement (in hips that were persistently painful), regardless of baseline BMI.
All key points available for members only

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

Obesity is an important, modifiable risk factor for the development and progression of knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA) (1). As such, clinical guidelines commonly recommend weight loss in patients with osteoarthritis who are overweight or obese (2,3). However, it is currently unknown whether weight loss reduces the risk of knee or hip replacement in those with comorbid osteoarthritis and obesity.

Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe the association between weight loss and the risk of knee and hip replacement, after considering known risk factors for joint replacement, in an osteoarthritis-specific cohort.

Obesity is an important, modifiable risk factor for the development and progression of knee and hip osteoarthritis.
bulb
Care should be taken when advising weight loss in older people (aged >65 years) to ensure the maintenance of lean body mass and bone density.

METHODS

  • The authors of this study conducted a time-to-event survival analysis from a population-based cohort of participants who had or were at risk of clinically significant knee osteoarthritis at baseline.
to unlock full access to this review and 761 more