Effect of high-intensity strength training on knee pain and knee joint compressive forces among adults with knee osteoarthritis: the START randomized clinical trial

Review written by Todd Hargrove info

Key Points

  1. High-intensity strength training for knee osteoarthritis (OA) was not superior to low intensity training or general health workshop attendance in reducing knee pain and knee joint compressive forces during walking.
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BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

Knee osteoarthritis (OA) affects more than 250 million adults worldwide and is a leading cause of disability (1). Prior research has shown that disease progression is associated with thigh muscle weakness, and that resistance training is effective at reducing pain. However, questions remain about what level of intensity for resistance training is optimal.

This study sought to determine whether high-intensity strength training reduced knee pain and knee joint compressive forces better than low-intensity strength training and general health workshop attendance.

Knee osteoarthritis affects more than 250 million adults worldwide.
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This study supports the view that a key ingredient in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain is often not the exact details of the intervention, but rather the patient’s commitment to a plan of action that involves support from caregivers.

METHODS

The study included 377 adults with knee pain, radiographic evidence of mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis, and self-reported disability. Participants were older than 50, with a BMI ranging between 20 to 45. The study excluded people with severe osteoarthritis, and

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