Effects of high frequency strengthening on pain sensitivity and function in female runners with chronic patellofemoral pain

Review written by Dr Teddy Willsey info

Key Points

  1. Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is the most common injury reported by runners.
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BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is the most common injury reported by runners (1). Females are twice as likely to develop PFP compared to males (2). The cause of PFP is thought to be multifactorial. Evidence supports consideration of biomechanical (kinetic/kinematic) factors and training load variables (3). PFP can be chronic in up to 90% of cases. Annual prevalence for PFP approaches one in three runners and one in four in the general population (4). Recent investigations have brought to light the role that altered pain processing and central sensitization play in common chronic musculoskeletal pathologies (5).

The authors of this study sought out to investigate the effects of an 8-week, twice-daily high frequency strengthening program on function, pain, and pain sensitization in female runners with chronic PFP.

Females are twice as likely to develop patellofemoral pain compared to males.
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This paper showed that high frequency shorter duration resistance training (14 sessions per week) may be a viable option for runners.

METHODS

The single treatment group was comprised of 30 female participants (mean age = 32 +- 8 years) with chronic PFP symptoms (3-84 months) who reported running a minimum of 1 hour/week. A thorough clinical exam and history helped to standardize

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