Measurement properties for muscle strength tests following anterior cruciate ligament and/or meniscus injury: what tests to use and where do we need to go? A systematic review with meta-analyses for the OPTIKNEE consensus

Review written by Dr Travis Pollen info

Key Points

  1. The purpose of this systematic review was to summarize the measurement properties of knee strength tests after ACL and/or meniscus injuries.
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BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

After anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and meniscus injuries, weakness of the knee extensors and knee flexors is common and can affect patients’ function (1,2). A variety of tests are used to assess knee strength, including isokinetic dynamometry (the gold standard), isometric dynamometry (e.g. hand-held dynamometry [HHD]), and isotonic testing using weight machines. However, consensus is lacking on the measurement properties of these tests, which threatens their clinical utility.

The purpose of this systematic review was to summarize the reliability and validity of knee strength tests after ACL and/or meniscus injuries.

Weakness of the knee extensors and knee flexors is common after anterior cruciate ligament and meniscus injuries and can affect patients’ function.
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The authors suggest using isotonic testing (e.g. using a leg extension or leg curl machine) instead of isometric dynamometry (e.g. hand-held dynamometry) to measure knee flexion and extension strength.

METHODS

The authors searched multiple electronic databases for studies that investigated the reliability, construct validity, or criterion validity of knee extension or knee flexion tests. Studies were included if they were conducted on individuals who were a mean of ≤30 years

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