Medial collateral ligament injuries of the knee in male professional football players: a prospective three season study of 130 cases from the UEFA elite club injury study

Review written by Linda Truong info

Key Points

  1. 130 MCL injuries (3%) were reported over three seasons with a mean lay-off period of 24 days. The majority of these injuries were graded as a clinical grade I MCL injury.
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BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

Medial collateral ligament (MCL) injuries are the most reported traumatic knee injuries in men’s professional football (soccer) with an average of two MCL injuries occurring per club per season [1]. However, few epidemiological studies exist around MCL injuries. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the mechanisms of MCL injuries as well as evaluate the diagnostic and treatment methods used by medical teams. A final aim of the study was to determine the agreement between clinical evaluation and MRI for grading the severity of the injury.

MCL injuries are the most reported traumatic knee injuries in men’s professional football (soccer).
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The lay-off period was longer for grade II MCL injuries that were braced compared to grade II MCL injuries with no bracing (42 days vs. 32 days).

METHODS

This study was part of a long-term prospective cohort study investigating injury incidence in professional men’s football in Europe since 2001. 51 teams (2018 individual players) from the highest national level were followed for one to three seasons. MCL injuries

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