ONLY ONE PATIENT OUT OF FIVE ACHIEVES SYMMETRICAL KNEE FUNCTION 6 MONTHS AFTER PRIMARY ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

Review written by Dr Michael Reiman info

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a common knee injury sustained by athletes and non-athletes that can limit their ability to return to sport or physical activity. Determining readiness to return to sport and function is increasing in popularity. The contribution of adequate strength and functional ability with hop testing lacks clarity. The aim of this study was to determine what percentage of patients achieve symmetrical knee function 6 months after ACL reconstruction (ACLR), and to identify the variables that increase and decrease the odds of achieving symmetrical function. Image

METHODS

A retrospective review of charts on 4093 patients who had undergone a single-bundle autologous hamstring tendon (HT) or bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) technique for ACLR was performed. General surgical and post-surgical rehabilitation was described. The authors examined all patients at 6 months on the following: isokinetic concentric quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength at 900/second, and a single-leg hop test.

Limb symmetry index (LSI) of peak quadriceps and hamstrings torque, as well as single-leg hop tests were calculated [as involved limb/uninvolved limb x 100] for each test. Patients who reached a LSI of ≥ 90% in all three tests were considered to have achieved symmetrical knee function.

RESULTS

4093 patients completed isokinetic testing and 3541 completed hop testing. The primary results were:

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