Pain and disability in women with patellofemoral pain relate to kinesiophobia, but not to patellofemoral joint loading variables

Review written by Shruti Nambiar info

Key Points

  1. Screening for kinesiophobia is linked to developing a successful treatment program, due to its negative influence on rehabilitation outcomes.
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BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

Poor outcomes have been reported in more than 50% of patients with patellofemoral pain (PFP) (1). Increased patellofemoral joint (PFJ) loading has been observed in several activities among people with PFP. However, there is growing evidence pointing to the contribution of psychological factors on pain and disability in women with PFP (1).

Kinesiophobia has been proposed to be one of the mediators for impaired kinematics during stair ambulation. This study aimed to simultaneously investigate the relationship of PFJ loading variables and kinesiophobia with self-reported pain and disability during stair ascent in women with PFP.

Poor outcomes have been reported in more than 50% of patients with patellofemoral pain.
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Clinicians should acknowledge the complexity of PFP and consider the contribution of psychosocial factors along with other factors during the assessment and management of women with PFP.

METHODS

57 women were recruited via advertisements for this cross-sectional study. Eligibility criteria included:

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