The NordBord test reveals persistent knee flexor strength asymmetry when assessed two and five years after ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendon autograft

Review written by Adam Johnson info

Key Points

  1. At two- and five-years post-ACL reconstruction patients appear to demonstrate a significant deficit in eccentric knee flexor strength.
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BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

When performing an Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction, the graft is commonly harvested from the semitendinosus and sometimes the gracilis of the ipsilateral limb. Monitoring and understanding of the implications of this are important as the medial knee flexors that are harvested for this reconstruction technique play an important role in the stabilization of the knee joint (1).

The primary objective of this study was to assess the recovery of knee flexor muscle strength using both a concentric seated measure (Biodex) and a prone eccentric measure (Nordbord) at both two- and five-years post-reconstruction. The secondary objective of the study was to investigate any relationship between knee flexor strength and both perceived and objective knee function measures.

When performing an Anterior Cruciate Ligament reconstruction, the graft is commonly harvested from the semitendinosus and sometimes the gracilis of the ipsilateral limb.
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This study highlights the importance of ensuring we are completing a wide-ranging battery of testing when looking to understand how patients are responding to their rehabilitation.

METHODS

The subjects for this study were all taken from “Project ACL” which is a rehabilitation outcome registry that aims to follow patients at regular time points following ACL reconstruction to review a range of subjective and objective markers. Specifically for

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