Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA): when do the risks of TKA overcome the benefits? Double risk of failure in patients up to 65 years old

Review written by Dr Anthony Teoli info

Key Points

  1. Younger patients (<65 years of age) undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are 2-3x more likely (depending on their age) to require revision TKA when compared to their older counterparts (>65 years of age).
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BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

There is a growing tendency for primary total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) to be done in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) younger than 65 years of age. However, younger patients with a TKA are at greater risk of revision when compared to their older counterparts (1).

To better understand the risks of TKA in this age group (< 65 years old), this study documented the survival rate in the middle-aged patient group up to 65 years old and compared it with other age groups of patients undergoing TKA for knee OA.

There is a growing tendency for primary total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) to be done in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) younger than 65 years of age.
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It is crucial that patients <65 years of age are made aware of the increased risk of revision TKA (2-3x higher depending on their age) and its associated risks.

METHODS

The Register of Orthopaedic Prosthetic Implants (RIPO) regional registry was used to analyze the results of patients < 80 years old with knee OA who underwent a TKA from 2000 to 2019. The database was investigated according to age group

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