NEGATIVE BELIEFS ABOUT BACK PAIN ARE ASSOCIATED WITH PERSISTENT, HIGH LEVELS OF LOW BACK DISABILITY IN COMMUNITY-BASED WOMEN

Review written by Dr Sarah Haag info

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

Low back pain is the leading cause of disability globally, yet evidence based treatments for low back pain are lacking. Beliefs about low back pain have been found to be important in the development of chronic low back pain and disability, as well as influencing outcomes of treatment. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between beliefs about back pain and the development and progression of low back pain and disability in community-based women.

METHODS

Participants were recruited from a previous cross-sectional study that investigated the role of androgens in females. The original sample was drawn from the Victoria Electoral Roll between 2002 until 2003. 506 women consented to participate in the study. Age, height and weight were self-reported. Data on pain intensity and disability were assessed using the Chronic Pain Grade Questionnaire. The Back Beliefs Questionnaire was used to investigate individuals' beliefs about back pain and it's associated consequences.

RESULTS

Data was collected on 442 (87.4%) participants at the 2-year follow up mark. A total of 108 (24.4%) women reported high-intensity low back pain which either developed, resolved, or persisted over 2 years. There was a trend for an association

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