THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SEGMENTAL ROLLING ABILITY AND LUMBAR MULTIFIDUS ACTIVATION TIME.

Review written by Greg Dea info

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

Segmental rolling involves deliberate, organised progressive rotation of segments of the body. Segmental rolling is rarely taught and even less understood, yet its ability to reveal altered motor control is extraordinary. Further, when demonstrated to a minimum level of competence, it reinforces general motor patterns that support complex movements involving the pillar - the upper quarter, trunk/core and lower quarter combined. Anecdotally, segmental rolling is used in rehabilitation and corrective exercise with great effect, significally changing the balance between prime movers and local stabilisers, including the core and hamstring. The objective of this study was to assess the time-based balance between a prime mover (anterior deltoid) and a local stabiliser (multifidus) and to see if faulty sequencing was related to the inability to segmentally roll in those without dysfunction.

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METHODS

Twenty subjects were chosen based on passing an upper and lower quarter screen, as well as a thoracic screen. They were cleared of mobility restrictions that might limit segmental rolling. They were assessed for ability to segmentally roll. They were also assessed for temporal sequencing of local stabilisers and prime movers using fine wire EMG into the multifidus and anterior deltoid. A pilot intervention study was then conducted on subjects who were assessed as being unable to segmentally roll, with re-assessment of temporal sequencing post interventions.

RESULTS

Those who could segmentally roll had multifidus activity prior to anterior deltoid. Those who could not segmentally roll had the opposite sequence, confirming that there is a multifidus muscle onset latency relative to the activation of the anterior deltoid. Intervention

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