Treating low back pain in athletes: a systematic review with meta-analysis

Review written by Dr Mary O'Keeffe info

Key Points

  1. Exercise is the most frequently studied intervention in athletes with low back pain (LBP), followed by manual therapy (massage and spinal manipulation) and biomechanical modification (unstable footwear and bike saddle height adjustment).
All key points available for members only

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

Low back pain (LBP) is a common presenting complaint among athletes, with a prevalence of 18-65% across different sports. Surgical and pharmacological interventions are commonly used approaches for treating LBP in this population. There is a lack of clarity on the effectiveness of non-surgical and non-pharmacological approaches in this population. This systematic review aimed to clarify things by examining the evidence for non-pharmacological management of LBP in athletes.

Low back pain is a common presenting complaint among athletes, with a prevalence of 18-65% across different sports.
bulb
Athletes will naturally have different physical demands and goals compared to the general population, but treatment of their LBP should still follow the same general principles.

METHODS

Study design: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) Population: Recreational or professional athletes aged ≥18 years from any sport Definition of LBP: Non-specific pain localised below the costal margin and above the inferior gluteal folds, with or without

to unlock full access to this review and 623 more