Clinical consensus on diagnosis and treatment of patients with chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the leg: a Delphi analysis

Review written by Dr Melinda Smith info

Key Points

  1. Consensus from an international expert panel was established to provide guidance for the diagnosis and treatment of chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS).
All key points available for members only

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) is a painful condition most commonly affecting the lower limb, particularly the anterior compartment of the leg. It is described as a reversible form of abnormally increased intramuscular pressure during exercise which, within a relatively noncompliant fascia, impedes local muscle blood flow and impairs the neuromuscular function of the tissues within a compartment (1). There is a lack of high-quality research studies to guide the development of clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of the condition.

The aim of this Delphi study was to establish expert consensus on practical issues guiding diagnosis and treatment of CECS.

Chronic exertional compartment syndrome is a painful condition most commonly affecting the lower limb, particularly the anterior compartment of the leg.
bulb
Experts agreed that a standardized rehabilitation protocol should be used postoperatively.

METHODS

  • A Delphi study is a well-established approach that uses several rounds of questionnaires to establish consensus opinion (agreement) among a panel of experts.
to unlock full access to this review and 787 more