Extended knee control programme lowers weekly hamstring, knee and ankle injury prevalence compared with an adductor strength programme or self-selected injury prevention exercises in adolescent and adult amateur football players: a two-armed cluster-randomised trial with an additional comparison arm

Review written by Dr Travis Pollen info

Key Points

  1. This study compared the efficacy of the extended Knee Control program (a general lower extremity injury prevention program) to an adductor strengthening program and self-selected injury prevention programs in adolescent and adult amateur footballers.
All key points available for members only

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

Injury prevention programs (IPPs) like the 11+ (1), the Knee Control program (2), and the Adductor Strengthening Program (3) have been shown to be efficacious in randomized controlled trials. For example, in one study of sub-elite male footballers, adductor strengthening reduced groin injuries by 41% (3).

However, real-world effectiveness of these IPPs tends to be lower, potentially due to coaches modifying the programs. The authors of this study created an extended version of the Knee Control program (4). They believed this version would better fit footballers at various levels because it included more exercise variations and progressions.

The purpose of this cluster-randomized trial was to compare the efficacy of the extended Knee Control program (a general lower extremity IPP) to:

  1. An adductor strengthening program (a short IPP focused on just the adductors) (3,5) and

  2. Self-selected IPPs in adolescent and adult amateur footballers.

The authors hypothesized that the extended Knee Control intervention would be most efficacious for combined ankle, knee, and hamstring injuries and the adductor strengthening intervention would be most efficacious for groin injuries.

Injury prevention programs have been shown to be efficacious in randomized controlled trials.
bulb
Amateur football teams may benefit from expert training on administration of their intervention as well as ongoing expert support and accountability throughout the season.

METHODS

A total of 46 teams made up of 502 footballers participated in the study (155 males, 347 females, 14-46 years old), which spanned one 7-month season. 17 teams (197 players) were cluster randomized to the extended Knee Control IPP and

to unlock full access to this review and 989 more