NO BASELINE STRENGTH DIFFERENCES BETWEEN FEMALE RECREATIONAL RUNNERS WHO DEVELOPED AN INJURY AND INJURY FREE RUNNERS DURING A 16-WEEK FORMALIZED TRAINING PROGRAM

Review written by Tom Goom info

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

Strength is considered a key foundation of athletic performance and a vital part of rehab. Question marks exist however regarding its exact role in injury development, especially in runners. This prospective cohort study aimed to determine if differences in baseline hip and knee strength exist in female runners who went on to develop an injury.

METHODS

A group of 54 healthy, female recreational runners were enrolled into a formalized training program for a full or half marathon. Baseline peak isometric strength was measured (using a hand-held dynamometer) for flexion and extension of the hip and knee alongside hip abduction and external rotation. Participants were provided with a 16-week training program for a full or half marathon by a certified track and field coach who matched it to their goals and current level. They met twice per week at group workouts where they reported any injuries or symptoms sustained during training.

RESULTS

50 runners were included for analysis at the conclusion of the program. Of these, 15 developed a running related injury (RRI). There was no significant difference in hip and knee isometric strength between injured and non-injured runners. There were also

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