RUN CLEVER—NO DIFFERENCE IN RISK OF INJURY WHEN COMPARING PROGRESSION IN RUNNING VOLUME AND RUNNING INTENSITY IN RECREATIONAL RUNNERS: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

Review written by Todd Hargrove info

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

Rapid increases in training load from running is a contributing factor to many running-related injuries. This study investigated whether there would be a difference in injury rate between two groups using different running load progressions: one focusing on progressing intensity and the other volume.

METHODS

447 healthy recreational runners (defined as people who ran 1-3 times per week for the past 6 months) were randomized into two groups: intensity and volume. Each group performed the same eight-week training program and then performed different programs for the next 16 weeks.

The intensity group increased the weekly volume of running at a “hard” pace (VO2max above 88%.) The volume group increased the total running volume at an “easy” pace (VO2max below 80%).

Both groups ran three times per week in a program that was periodised into 4-week blocks with structured progression/regression. In the first week in each block, weekly running volume would progress 23%, and in the last week running would regress 10%.

RESULTS

Despite the differences in the training programs, the injury rates between the two groups were not significantly different.

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