ASSOCIATION BETWEEN CHANGE IN SELF-EFFICACY AND REDUCTION IN DISABILITY AMONG PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PAIN

Review written by Robin Kerr info

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

As research progresses into the management of people experiencing persistent pain, the lens has shifted somewhat from the biomedical alleviation of pain, towards the reduction of disability. Internal success factors such as self-efficacy (SE) are suggested as positive attributes mediating the relationship between pain intensity and disability, with SE acting as a buffer against negative circumstances. This study investigated whether increased self-efficacy would help reduce disability in persistent pain patients.

METHODS

This was a longitudinal observational study (n=72) from a Japanese pain clinic. The pain conditions varied widely over 7 classifications. Patients received whatever treatment/therapy they were prescribed by the hospital doctors. Variables were assessed before and after 3 months of treatment (Pain Disability Assessment Scale (PDAS), Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for pain intensity). Univariate regression analyses clarified associations. The variables identified (PSEQ & NRS) were used in the multivariate regression analyses to detect the most relevant factor for reducing disability.

RESULTS

Univariate regression analyses: Changes in PSEQ (95% CI: -0.54 – -0.08, p = 0.008) and NRS (95% CI: 0.01–0.47, p = 0.04) were associated with reduction in PDAS. Changes in HADS depression and HADS anxiety scores were not significantly associated

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