It hurts to move! Assessing and treating movement-evoked pain in patients with musculoskeletal pain: a systematic review with meta-analysis

Review written by Todd Hargrove info

Key Points

  1. Exercise therapy is more effective than no treatment as an intervention for movement-evoked pain.
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BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

It is clinically important to know whether a client’s musculoskeletal pain is caused by movement or instead occurs at rest or spontaneously. However, research examining the effectiveness of interventions for treatment of pain often fail to provide data on whether the pain is related to movement or not.

This systematic review and meta-analysis sought to estimate the effects of different treatments on movement-evoked pain.

It is clinically important to know whether a client’s musculoskeletal pain is caused by movement or instead occurs at rest or spontaneously.
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Exercise therapy should be the first-choice treatment for movement-evoked pain.

METHODS

  • The authors searched databases for randomized controlled trials investigating the effect of musculoskeletal rehabilitation interventions on movement-evoked pain in adults.
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