Effects of mobilization treatment on sacroiliac joint dysfunction syndrome

Review written by Dr Sarah Haag info

Key Points

  1. Exercise, with or without the addition of manual therapy, may help people with sacroiliac pain.
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BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

Sacroiliac joint dysfunction syndrome (SIJDS) may be present in 15% to 30% of people with low back pain. Diagnosis and treatment of SIJDS continues to be a lively discussion amongst researchers and clinicians. Manual therapy has been recommended as a treatment for SIJDS, and this study aimed to evaluate the effects of sacroiliac joint (SIJ) manual therapy and home exercises on pain and quality of life in patients with SIJDS.

Sacroiliac dysfunction syndrome may be present in 15% to 30% of people with low back pain.
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This study found no significant difference between manual therapy and exercise when compared to exercise alone for people suffering from sacroiliac joint dysfunction syndrome.

METHODS

64 participants diagnosed with SIJDS were randomized into two groups using 1:1 method. One group was assigned an SIJ home exercise program and the other group received SIJ manual therapy and the same SIJ home exercise program.

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