THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN PAIN BELIEFS AND PAIN INTENSITY AND/OR DISABILITY IN PEOPLE WITH SHOULDER PAIN: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

Review written by Dr Sandy Hilton info

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

60% of those with acute onset of shoulder pain (SP) go on to have pain and disability 12 months after initial onset. Researchers have explored the reasons for persistent pain and questioned the characteristics of the 40% who did not go on to have pain. The literature supports key indicators of pain intensity and disability including anatomical, psychosocial, and physiological factors. However, these broad indicators are not precise enough for clinical application. This systematic review assessed the association between “pain beliefs and pain intensity and/or disability” and importantly, the predictive value of pain beliefs.

METHODS

The authors followed the Cochrane guidelines, registered their review with PROSPERO, and used the GRADE system for analyzing the strength of the evidence. Inclusion criteria focused on SP studies that reported on pain beliefs measures and differentiated between cognitive factors (including treatment preference, thoughts, beliefs, and expectations) and behavioral factors (including fear of pain and/or movement).

RESULTS

The systematic review reports:

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