Putting “heavy” into heavy slow resistance

Review written by Shruti Nambiar info

Key Points

  1. Exercise intensity can vary depending on the training history and current training status of an individual.
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BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

Eccentric training and heavy slow resistance (HSR) training show similar clinical and structural tendon changes in tendinopathic tissues in the short-term and long-term (1). Despite this, eccentric programs have been the mainstay for non-surgical tendinopathy management (1).

Load management is the key principle in tendinopathy rehabilitation. HSR training incorporates both concentric and eccentric muscle contractions and enables high intensity training, which is required for tendinopathy management.

This study aimed to explore how clinicians can ensure optimal high intensity can be applied in HSR training using different exercise parameters to promote tendon healing.

Eccentric training and heavy slow resistance training show similar clinical and structural tendon changes in tendinopathic tissues in the short-term and long-term.
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Heavy slow resistance training was shown to take less time to complete compared to eccentric training, which might influence patient compliance to the rehabilitation program.

HEAVY SLOW RESISTANCE CONSIDERATIONS

Relative submaximal lifting capacity

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