Differences in lower limb strength and structure after 12 weeks of resistance, endurance, and concurrent training

Review written by Sam Blanchard info

Key Points

  1. This is the first study to investigate the effects of concurrent training, mixing both endurance and resistance training, on hamstring muscle architecture and strength.
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BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

There has been a dedicated body of research into the prevalence of hamstring injuries in sprint-based sport. Yet, over the last 10 years, the burden of hamstring injury has not decreased. It is believed that a shorter fascicle length predisposes the hamstrings to injury. Until now, exercise-based interventions have focused on single contraction types. Eccentric training at high intensity is believed to increase fascicle length, whereas concentric training decreases fascicle length. But the reality of sport is that athletes training is varied, with weights and stationary bikes often utilised. Therefore, this study examined the effects of concurrent training, mixing both endurance and resistance training, on hamstring muscle architecture and strength.

Shorter fascicle length predisposes the hamstrings to injury.
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This study adds to clinicians reasoning process regarding risk vs reward, especially in cases of hamstring rehab or with those at risk of hamstring injury.

METHODS

32 recreationally active males with no history of hamstring injury in the last 12 months were randomly assigned to three groups: Resistance Training (RT), Endurance Training (END) or a mixture of both, Concurrent Training (CON). The RT and END groups

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