Corticosteroid therapy versus physiotherapy on pain, mobility and function in shoulder impingement: a short note

Review written by Todd Hargrove info

Key Points

  1. Corticosteroid injection is superior to physiotherapy for shoulder pain caused by subacromial impingement syndrome for function at 6-7 weeks, but not 12 weeks or longer.
All key points available for members only

BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE

Shoulder pain is globally estimated to be 67% and it is often correlated with subacromial impingement syndrome. One study even found that only half of shoulder pain cases completely recover after six months (1). Corticosteroid injection (CSI) and physiotherapy are both common treatments for shoulder pain.

This paper summarized the best evidence comparing these two treatments for pain, range of motion (ROM) and function in patients diagnosed with subacromial impingement syndrome (SAS).

Shoulder pain is globally estimated to be 67% and it is often correlated with subacromial impingement syndrome.
bulb
Clinicians need to determine whether utilising corticosteroid injection for temporarily superior shoulder function at 6-7 weeks is worth the risks of its known side effects.

METHODS

  • The authors reviewed research that would allow them to write an evidence-based statement comparing the efficacy of CSI to physiotherapy for treatment of shoulder pain caused by SAS.
to unlock full access to this review and 989 more